How to avoid a plane crash by getting a good night’s sleep

There are times when getting a little extra sleep can help you avoid a fatal crash.

The best way to do that, according to Dr John Darnell from the University of Oxford, is to keep a book of your sleeping habits.

Dr Darnett has published the findings of a study that shows people with a good, deep sleep have a lower risk of dying from car crashes.

He says there is no real data on this subject but he thinks it could be due to a better understanding of the way we sleep.

“Our sleep is highly variable,” he said.

“It is not as well studied as sleep, but I think it’s likely that our sleep is more influenced by lifestyle, lifestyle, or lifestyle choices, and the way that we sleep, whether it is bedtime or not.”

Dr Dang said sleep hygiene could be as important as sleep itself.

“So you really need to take a very good night sleep if you’re to prevent a fatal accident from occurring.” “

The researchers analysed data from over 20 years of UK driver deaths. “

So you really need to take a very good night sleep if you’re to prevent a fatal accident from occurring.”

The researchers analysed data from over 20 years of UK driver deaths.

In each year, the researchers analysed the number of deaths, how often they occurred, the number and cause of crashes, and their age.

They found the risk of crash increased with time spent sleeping.

“You are going to be more likely to be killed by another car if you are sleeping a lot more than the average,” Dr Dancill said.

When asked how much sleep a person needed to get a fatal collision avoided, Dr Dann said it was a “significant” factor.

“A good night-shift sleep is going to give you around 2.5 hours of sleep per night, whereas a sleep-deprived person will need between 4 and 5 hours.”

Dr Jarno van Vugt, a neuroscientist at the University in the Netherlands, says the study could be useful in helping people sleep better.

“This study was conducted in the past, but the fact that the drivers were all from the same generation and the risk profile is similar could be helpful,” he told BBC News.

Dr van Vuulst said the study should help doctors and policy makers understand what sleep is doing to our bodies and brains.

“Sleep is important for all of us,” he explained.

“We need to be able to regulate our sleep to avoid things like obesity, depression, anxiety, and other health problems.”

The study was published in the journal PLOS ONE.

The full article is available in full here.

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